Seasonalight

Light Seeking

More on Praximund.

By W. Bulach – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=64587917 Photo – the mighty Kauri, one of the most efficient nitrogen process recyclers on Planet Earth. Click on the image for more information.

Fluminism brings together my thoughts over a number of years. I offer an alternative to Biocentrism (Taylor), Ecocentrism (Naess) and, importantly, Anthropocentrism (Passmore, et al).

To be a Fluminist is to recognise oneself viscerally as part of the interconnectedness between all beings ~ Sanguimund, and in this realisation, to act with love, respect and responsibility in protecting these interconnections, minimising the breaking of their flows, to find fluministic ways to proliferate and send new flows ~ Praximund. … Read more

Applying the Precautionary Principle to Capitalism Itself.

Plastic waste snagged during floods along the River Wye. Photo by me. 

 

Unless you believe that we are members of some kind of intergalactic cult, we humans are not alien to this world. We are intrinsic to it; a manifestation of the diversity of all the life that ever existed.

Despite our geologically recent farming cultures, the schism between humans and the rest of nature is false. In fact, growing and harvesting food, generating our water and energy supplies, and getting rid of waste is where we are submerged deepest into the flows of life, and where we are perhaps closest to our teresapien kin. … Read more

Climate and ecological justice – fight for both! A Tweeterie

Climate scientists and activists are still tending to think and communicate to the masses in human socio-political terms, even going so far as to reject the worth of saving NGO-promo animals (trees, whales, pandas, polar bears), or other teresapiens in general as an un-emotive or meaningless exercise, and continuing to place the human species as central to all like a gravitational force.

To bring people into the Nawoken, may require the initial motivation of something much closer to themselves. What immediately touches us drives us. But tragically, that too is a legacy of white, ‘Enlightenment’ colonialist separation, reductionism, or bifurcation. Many of the indigenous communities, before the violence of European colonisation erupted, were already living vast eco-logical interconnected lives, honouring and respecting living beings and places, to include the inorganic, where humans were culturally not centre-placed in isolation in all decision making. … Read more

My own mental wellbeing, welldoing.

In the young wood, Westhope, where the sparrowhawks wheel. Photo by me.
This, chosen as one of the Guardian readers top 2010 photos.

I just want to note this moment in terms of my own mental health. As an ecophilosopher, I do not separate myself from my thoughts. It would be like ripping me apart, limb from limb. I write about life-love as a devotion, and I am similarly devoted to my cause. These are exceptional and difficult times, and it is important to recognise despair and kindle hope. If someone attacks my core devotion, and any attempt to recognise despair and kindle hope, they are attacking me. … Read more

A note on ecolinguistics and my neologisms.

L is for Language (photo by me)

 

My first language is English. It matters not what my ethnic heritage is or is not. I did not choose for it to be. I was born into an English speaking family.

English, according to linguistics scholars, is a Western Germanic language on the family tree of all languages. It also uses core words originating in Latin, French, Norse, and others through acts of (brutal) Colonialism.

I am also aware that English is also contended as the “lingua franca”, the first globalized linguistic strategy of humans, but I would argue against that as a good thing, as I would argue against the validity of globalization itself. … Read more

Lumilattiss, and guest blog by Tim Sykes.

It’s striking to realise a personal sense of pure elation from the effect of sunlight in its many forms. Even more so, when light and water mix, and with sounds. I find it healing.

In our rivers, shallow oceans, even at the bottom of swimming pools and upon cave roofs, we are familiar with light refracting back and forth through gentle and chaotic laps of surface waves. A lace-like dance of photons hits our retinas, processes in our brains and triggers emotions.

These hypnotic and beautiful patterns of light are officially known as caustic networks. Most of us would assume caustic is a type of chemical capable of burning, and definitely something to avoid. … Read more

Anthropivot/al

Yellow Shell moth: Camptogramma bilineata, on my finger. Photo by me.

 

Human moments in time/space where great change could arise, good or bad, especially in relation to problems of the Anthropocene.

Anthrop from Greek anthrōpos “man; human being”

Pivot/al, a thing, act, or being of critical importance  to the development or success of that thing, act, or being, or something else.

Anthropivotal.

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Audio:

 

  … Read more

Symbioethics.

Wye at Hay, firesmoke and St Mary’s Church tower. Photo by me.

For clarity, just in case people don’t understand this word I now use instead of Environmental Ethics in the field of Philosophy.

I contend there is no such thing as an external ‘environment’, based on new/ancient understanding of the interconnectivity of all, within and without. We are symlings among symlings, inhaling, ingesting, excreting, respiring, transpiring what is without and within. All is flow in the nagorasphere.

In a sense, environmentalism never truly reflected reality, and so was always going to fail in the long run. Evidence abounds.

Sym ~ assimilated from Greek form of syn- word element meaning “together with, jointly; alike; at the same time;” from PIE (proto-indo-european) ksun or sm meaning “together”. … Read more

Beavers are Fluminists.

Beavers are Fluminists. By Ginny Battson. First published by Zoomorphic October 9th 2017.

Spring 2005, and I peer through my living room window to check the weather. It’s looking good, the sun is out. My husband has left for a day’s work at UMaine Orono, so I lower my baby girl into her papoose and strap her in. We are through the fly screen door and out onto the road.

The residential lots of leafy Gilbert Street are studded with blue and red flags, remnants of last winter’s political war that saw Republican oilmen G.W. Bush and Dick Cheney take charge of the Whitehouse for a second term. … Read more

Healing, and The Stubborn Light of Things.

If you haven’t heard Melissa Harrison’s The Stubborn Light of Things, you’re missing a treat; it is a salve for our times. It began at the start of lockdown here in the UK, intent on bringing the natural world, at least in audio, to those more unable to get out. This week (number 25), I’m honoured to be taking part.

Melissa is an award winning nature writer, novelist, diarist, and now podcaster (with a wonderful supporting team), and I possess all her books. I look forward to adding her latest to my shelves, a collection of her beloved Nature Notebook columns written for The Times, now to be published in hardback this coming November by Faber & Faber, also named The Stubborn Light of Things. … Read more

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